‘Internet’ a reality soon?

“WHAT WE WERE SAYING WAY BACK WHEN”

Journal 6/3/1983

P1 Radiation-affected people said caught between US, RepMar and the lawyers The people of the Marshall Islands, particularly radiation-affected people, are caught between three groups — the US, RepMar and the lawyers, each with different interests, Alele Museum Curator Jerry Knight told the visiting World Council of Churches radiation team. Regarding the present situation in the Marshalls, Knight sees RepMar’s back up against the wall financially and the private lawyers for the radiation-affected atolls only concerned about their clients and not what’s good for all the people of the Marshall Islands. “Lawyers are now a significant political power,” he said.

P6 New Mieco restaurant rate A-1 One of the nicest things now going on in Ebeye is the recently opened and renovated Mieco Restaurant. The restaurant is located on the lagoon road as you turn right off the Ebeye dock. One recent visitor was surprised to find a super fresh salad available with lettuce, tomatoes and crunchy crips cucumbers.

Journal 6/9/1995

P3 Landfill work for 150-room hotel starts The biggest hotel to grace the beaches of Majuro is now under construction in Delap. PII/McConnell Dowell has started landfill work in the lagoon in front of the Mieco Beach area as the first step in building a 150-room hotel.

P10 Jet kain melele By Yeller Bnzmn The MIHS graduating class motto said, “The dream of yesterday is the hope of today and the reality of tomorrow.” And the Drop Out motto said, “What you dream of today won’t happen tomorrow and it’s not worth the future…”

P10 Sand found on Uliga beach A patch of sand measuring approximately 4”x4” was discovered on the district center beach of Majuro early Thursday morning August 12 by a tourist picking through trash near the lagoon edge of the island. The tourist, Albert Wenfield, of Louisville, Kentucky, made the following statement to police: “I was on the beach collecting coke bottles to take back to Kitco for 1¢ each when I tripped over a sewer pipe leading across the beach into the lagoon,” he said. “I dropped the bottles and put my hands out in front of me to brace myself for the fall. When I hit the trash below me some of it brushed aside and I saw sand underneath. It was filled with pieces of broken beer bottles and hard to see, but I was sure it was sand.” Unfortunately for the visitor he did not know it was against the law to walk on the beach and he was immediately handcuffed and jailed by the district police. He died four hours later in his cell. According to officials of Armer Ishoda Memorial Hospital, the death resulted from infections in Wenfield’s hands. “He should have known better than touch anything on the beach,” one doctor was quoted as saying. (From the Journal, 1971)

P18 Hooking up with Internet It is a good possibility NTA will be able to provide the “Internet” serve to Majuro in the future. This service will link people in the Marshall Islands with over 30 million other computer users worldwide. Currently only the government has access to the Internet. Both the Ministry of Resources and Development and the Land Grant program. It is hoped that individuals may soon enjoy this benefit.

P21 Maryknoll students coming to Majuro Maryknoll High School students will come to Majuro again this summer to assist Assumption High School students with academic work and other school projects. The group has three boys and five girls, accompanied by their Principal Andrew Corcoran and the chairperson of the theology department, Ann Hannan.

Journal 6/9/2006

P1 Four dollar fuel crisis hits RMI Prices are going through the roof in Majuro as consumers and businesses are taking a beating from rising fuel costs. Gas prices surged past the $4 mark in Majuro for the first time ever this past weekend.

P25 True Blue wins memorial comp True Blue skippered by Marshalls Billfish Club President Melvin Aliven won last Saturday’s Lazarus Andrike Memorial Tournament. True Blue crew included Royal Australian Navy newcomers Mark and Sandy Carey took out first with a 55-pound yellowfin tuna.

“Subscribe”

Enter your email address to subscribe to this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

Join 453 other subscribers.