Bikinians to settle Maui?

Journal 7/20/1984

P3 Bikinians visit Maui The relocation of the Bikini people to a 274-acre dairy in Maui is still lacking a formal “yokwe” but additional information was exchanged between the Bikinians (who were on Maui with their lawyer Jonathan Weisgall), and Milton Lai, a leader in the Waihee community, and Mayor Hannibal Tavares. Lai told the group of visiting Bikinians the community is willing to keep an open mind regarding the resettlement. Bikini liaison officer Ralph Waltz said that the Bikinians are happy with the lifestyle that they see on Maui, and that the leaders who have been to Maui feel their children would do better and be better prepared to return to Bikini after being on Maui.

P5 AMI 748 inaugural flight to Fiji The Air Marshall Islands BAC 748 returned to Majuro July 19 after an inaugural flight run to Fiji. It left Majuro at 7am and arrived Nadi about 7:30pm, with intermediate stops in Tarawa and Funafuti.

P6 Law students Witten Philippo and Alik Alik were in the district center last week visiting their families. They are attending law school in Papua New Guinea on full scholarships provided by the Nitijela, and will complete their four years of studies this year. Witten is a graduate of Marianas Senior High and Alik is a product of Marshall Islands High School.

Journal 7/19/1996

P1 Why are Jaluit people best? Jaluit people are different from other Marshallese — not because they’re smarter, but because they’re willing to take risks in order to succeed. So says Jaluit Senator Alvin Jacklick. He said the engine for a revitalized Jaluit development program is “a lot of young men and women who are extremely ambitious and aggressive in pursuing development for the benefit of Jaluit.” Jaluit people are independent minded, Jacklick said. If most people are saying something’s good, Jaluit islanders take the opposite opinion, he said. While most Marshallese aren’t excited about economic problems here, Jaluit takes a different view. “We feel that the economy is not as healthy as 10 years ago, and we have to do something to help the government and ourselves,” he said.

P1 Eat your heart out, Majuro The Jilala II did it again. Under the direction of Caption/Fishmaster/Minister/Iroij Imata Kabua, the Jilala II team caught an awesome 674 pound marlin recently. Also involved in the big catch were Senator Rilong Lemari, Moses Michael and Alvin Peter.

Journal 7/20/2007

P1 Note gets test bill in Senate A key US senator has introduced legislation to reinstate funding for the 177 Health Program, make Marshall Islands nuclear test site workers eligible for a special US compensation fund, and direct the Department of Energy to report regularly to Congress on monitoring of the Runit Dome nuclear waste site at Enewetak. But the legislation, introduced last week by Senator Jeff Bingaman, does not offer any personal injury or land damage compensation, instead referring the dispute between the US and Marshall Islands governments over the extent of nuclear test exposure to further study by the US National Academy of Sciences.

P4 Sea Patrol gives Mary Jane a ride Marshall Islands police have confiscated more than 66 pounds of marijuana that washed up in a boat on a remote outer atoll earlier this month. The drug has an estimated street value of over $200,000. Reports from Ailinglaplap Atoll had initially indicated the drugs discovered were cocaine. But after the patrol vessel Lomor was dispatched, police confirmed that it was large bails of marijuana not cocaine.

P8 Out-migration still growing Out-migration from the RMI slightly decreased last year, although statistics show a steady trend of migration to the US since 1990. Aenet Rowa of Yokwe Online wrote up this story recently, showing that: An average of 412 people per year left RMI from 1991-1996; an average of 1,037 people per year left RMI from 1996-2001; and an average of 1,049 people per year left RMI from 2002-2006.

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