Women being left behind

WHAT WE WERE SAYING WAY BACK WHEN

Journal 9/20/1983

P1 Nitijela passes resolution that approves Compact Nitijela September 20 approved by a vote of 21 for and five against Resolution No. 27 to approve entry into the Compact of Free Association. Opposition members objected to the resolution for not waiting for certification of the results of the plebiscite by the Chief Electoral Officer. President Amata Kabua argued that Nitijela should take their lawyers advice and pass the resolution. If the government is taken to court, fine, as that’s the only way to find out if they are right or wrong. 

Journal 9/22/1995

P1 Bomb the N-bomb study A resolution introduced into Nitijela would repudiate the results of the nationwide radiological survey that the government funded over the last five years. The resolution formally declares that the Marshall Islands government “does not accept as valid or accurate the findings of the study as contained in the Summary Report” presented to the government in December 1994. The resolution, introduced by Vice Speaker Litokwa Tomeing and Majuro Senator tony deBrum, was highly critical of both the contents of the report, and affiliations of scientists on the international advisory panel for the study that the government approved.

P3 Audit confirms: MEC profitable The Marshalls Energy Company produced a net profit in both 1993 and 1994, according to the Auditor General’s report submitted to Nitijela this week. The audit states that 1993 was the last year for MEC to receive a government subsidy and that in 1993 it turned a net profit of $316,149. Meanwhile, the audit confirmed that Air Marshall Islands had an operating loss of $5.4 million in 1994 — but the airline would have almost broken even if it had not been for an extraordinarily high maintenance bill for the DC-8. AMI had estimated the “C-Check” overhaul would cost $1.2 million, but it ended up costing over $3 million.

P5 The new Chinese Wall The newest construction site in Delap is not the new hotel which is being slap-dashed into existence. Not anymore. Right across the road from the hustle and bustle is a slam-bang, thank you ma’am strange activity which we understand is the mobilization of a contract to build the Chinese embassy here. From what we understand, there were quite a few questions about who the 20-some odd new Chinese guys were who arrived in Majuro recently. Well, it looks like just another outside job, not much hope there for local employment. Go back to drinking your coffee.

P19 Women left behind The number of Marshallese women receiving college scholarships continues to be lower than men, with the percentage of women declining slightly from 994 to 1995. During school year 1994-95, 121 students received scholarships, only 48 of whom were women. In 1995-96, the number of females dropped to 39 out of 101.

Journal 9/22/2006

P22 Congealed confusion The government’s long-established program of checking the hygiene and health of restaurants in Majuro could be on the verge of collapse because of confusion between the RMI EPA and the Ministry of Health over which agency is to be responsible for organization the inspections. The RMI EPA says the primary authority organizing the quarterly inspections is supposed to transfer to the Ministry of Health. But the ministry says it has not been informed of this.

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